The|Coinologist.

Always Buying Coins, Currency, and Cool Stuff.

Posts Tagged ‘federal reserve

Gold Facts

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Gold being at record highs,needless to say this stockpile is “Worth A Fortune!”

Written by Robert L. Wilson

August 12, 2011 at 12:08 pm

Cash by the Pound

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I can remember visiting the B.E.P. in Washington D.C. when I was a teen.  My Father was a true patriot and this was one of many family vacations that had us blazing from state to state.  Destinations included Civil War Battlefields, National Parks, and of course our Nations Capital.  I remember the tour vividly and also remember being able to buy a bag of shredded cash at the gift shop.  Well things might be very different these days, but you can still get your shredded cash. The Bureau of Engraving and Printing offers 5lb bags of Shredded U.S. Currency. This bag contains approximately $10,000 worth of Shredded U.S. currency notes.  Judging from the photo below, it looks like the gift shops at the various Federal Reserve Banks are in on it as well.

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Written by Robert L. Wilson

May 20, 2011 at 12:00 pm

The Cleveland Federal Reserve

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Being a Buckeye, and knowing the love my Father had for our home town, Cleveland, Ohio.  I always enjoy finding historic things from this great city.  The Cleveland Federal Reserve is a true piece of architectural and design history.  It had taken four architects thirteen months and a thousand sketches, plus a team of draftsmen creating 1,924 blueprints, to prepare for the moment of groundbreaking for the new Cleveland Federal Reserve Bank. Two years and $8.25 million later, the Bank was completed. Fronting two hundred feet on East 6th Street and 216 feet on Superior Avenue, the thirteen-story building is a modern adaptation of an Italian Renaissance palazzo, or fortress palace. At the sidewalk level is a base of granite from Stonington, Maine. The remaining exterior of the building is covered with marble, a pinkish stone quarried in Tate, Georgia. The stone closely resembles granite and retains a warm color when weathered.

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Written by Robert L. Wilson

May 9, 2011 at 5:09 am

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