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Posts Tagged ‘congress

2012 Nisei Soldiers of World War II Bronze Medal

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Public Law:  111-254

Obverse
Designer:  Joel Iskowitz
Engraver:  Charles L. Vickers
Description:  The obverse features Nisei (second generation Americans of Japanese ancestry) soldiers from both the European and Pacific theaters.  The 442nd RCT color guard is depicted in the lower field of the medal. The inscriptions on the outer rim are NISEI SOLDIERS OF WORLD WAR II and GO FOR BROKE, the motto of the 442nd RCT, which was eventually used to describe the work of all three units.

Reverse
Designer:  Don Everhart
Engraver:  Don Everhart
Description:  The reverse depicts the insignias of the 100th INF BN, 442nd RCT and MIS. The 100th INF BN insignia features a taro leaf and a traditional Hawaiian helmet, both of which are emblematic of the unit’s Hawaiian roots.  The “Go for Broke” Torch of Liberty shoulder patch represents the 442nd RCT. The MIS insignia is represented by a sphinx, a traditional symbol of secrecy.  The inscriptions on the outer rim are the title of the three units represented on the medal — the 100th INF BN, 442nd RCT and MIS.  In addition, the years 1941-1946, the defined years of World War II according to the Department of Defense, are inscribed in the upper right field of the medal. A decorative ribbon connects the outer rim with the inscriptionsACT OF CONGRESS and 2010. The three stars positioned along the border represent the three units being honored.

Image/Text: U.S.Mint

Written by Robert L. Wilson

October 8, 2012 at 8:08 am

Senator Edward William Brooke III Bronze Medal

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Bronze duplicate of Congressional Gold Medal

Public Law:  110-260

Obverse
Designer:  Don Everhart
Description:  The obverse features an image of Senator Brooke with the inscription EDWARD WILLIAM BROOKE on the right side.

Reverse
Designer:  Phebe Hemphill
Description:  The reverse depicts the United Sates Capitol Building at the top of the medal and the Massachusetts State House at the bottom between two olive branches.  The middle of the design showcases the inscription AMERICA’S GREATNESS LIES IN ITS WONDROUS DIVERSITYOUR MAGNIFICENT PLURALISM HAS MADE THIS COUNTRY GREATOUR EVER-WIDENING DIVERSITY WILL KEEP US GREAT.  Additional inscriptions are ACT OF CONGRESS 2008, and MASSACHUSETTS STATE HOUSE.

Image/Text:  U.S.Mint

Written by Robert L. Wilson

September 27, 2012 at 8:27 am

International Mints | London Mint 1910-1915

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London Mint glass negative photo published between 1910 & 1915.

Check out other Coinologist archive photo posts here.

Written by Robert L. Wilson

July 9, 2012 at 9:09 am

Assistant Director of the U.S. Mint | 1939

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To be named Assistant Director of Mint. Washington, D.C., March 23, 1939. Dr. Frank Leland Howard, 31, former economics instructor at the University of Virginia, will be appointed Assistant Director of the U.S. Mint to succeed Miss Mary M. O’Reilly, who retired in October, it has been Learned. Dr. Howard has been serving as Assistant Director since last December 15.  Check out other Coinologist archive photo posts here.

Source: Library of Congress

Written by Robert L. Wilson

October 10, 2011 at 8:05 am

Citizens Coin Advisory Committee

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Established in 2003, the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee (CCAC) is the “informed, experienced and impartial resource” of our United States numismatic future.   While Congress must authorize every coin and most medals that the United States Mint manufactures, it is the CCAC that advises the Secretary of the Treasury on what our country’s future coinage will look and feel like.  The CCAC submits a letter to the Secretary of the Treasury after each public meeting, next meeting being March 1, 2011.  Their site has a great resource to view past legislation about the historical events and personal achievements Congress honors through the authorization of coins and medals.

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Written by Robert L. Wilson

February 28, 2011 at 8:08 am

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