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Treasury Deptartment Money Lift | 1914

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  • Title: Treasury Dept. Money lift: all U.S. money carried in and out on this lift, [1914]
  • Date Created/Published: [1914]

Check out other Coinologist archive photo posts here.

Written by Robert L. Wilson

September 7, 2012 at 8:29 am

Bureau Engraving & Printing | Money Section of Examining Division Vault.

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  • Title: Bureau Engraving & Printing money section of Examining division vault. Approximately 750,000,000 of partially completed money etc. stored in this vault when photographed,
  • Date Created/Published: [1914]

Check out other Coinologist archive photo posts here.

Written by Robert L. Wilson

September 6, 2012 at 8:29 am

Inspecting Sheets of Paper Money | Bureau of Printing & Engraving, Washington, D.C.

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  • Title: Inspecting sheets of paper money, Bureau of Printing and Engraving, Washington, D.C.
  • Creator(s): Keystone View Company.
  • Date Created/Published: Meadville, Pa. … : Keystone View Company, Manufacturers and Publishers, c1917.

Check out other Coinologist archive photo posts here.

Written by Robert L. Wilson

September 5, 2012 at 12:29 pm

Making Paper Money | Bureau of Printing & Engraving, Washington, D.C.

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  • Title: Making paper money, Bureau of Printing and Engraving, Washington, D.C.
  • Creator(s): Keystone View Company.
  • Date Created/Published: Meadville, Pa. : Keystone View Co., c1916.

Check out other Coinologist archive photo posts here.

Written by Robert L. Wilson

September 5, 2012 at 8:29 am

Bureau Ptg. & Eng. Machine for Sizing & Drying Money

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  • Title: Bureau Ptg. & Eng. Machine for sizing and drying money, New Method
  • Date Created/Published: [between 1909 and 1932]
  • Medium: 1 photographic print.
  • Summary: Photograph shows a woman at her workstation in the Bureau of Engraving and Printing.

Check out other Coinologist archive photo posts here.

Written by Robert L. Wilson

September 4, 2012 at 12:29 pm

Grinding & Processing the Ink | Bureau of Engraving & Printing

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  • Title: [Workers grinding and processing the ink used to print paper money at the Bureau of Engraving & Printing]
  • Creator(s): Johnston, Frances Benjamin, 1864-1952, photographer
  • Date Created/Published: [ ca.1890]

Check out other Coinologist archive photo posts here.

Written by Robert L. Wilson

September 3, 2012 at 8:29 am

Gold Bars and Certificates on Display | Bureau of Engraving & Printing

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Washington, D.C. – Starting this month, three .9999 fine gold bars with a combined value of more than $2 million are on display indefinitely at the Bureau of Engraving and Printing’s (BEP) Visitor Center in Washington, DC.  Each gold bar displayed at the BEP weighs 400.034 troy ounces of pure gold for a combined weight of 1,200.102 troy ounces of pure gold.  The bars are on loan from Working Stock* at the West Point Mint.

Accompanying the gold bar display are examples of Gold Certificates from the BEP’s Historical Resource Center.  Earlier in our nation’s history, gold coins were used to settle business transactions.  However, they were heavy and expensive to transport.  In 1863, Congress passed an Act to create Gold Certificates.  Initially, these notes were certificates of deposit.  One could deposit gold at the Treasury and receive Gold Certificates in exchange.  Produced by the BEP, Gold Certificates were issued in denominations of $20, $100, $500, $1,000, and $10,000.  In 1907, Congress authorized a $10 note.

Gold Certificates and coins disappeared from circulation in 1933 when the Great Depression and the international financial crisis created havoc in much of the world’s monetary systems.  Following the passage of the Gold Reserve Act of 1934, most private possession of gold was outlawed and Gold Certificates were exclusively held by Federal Reserve Banks and the Department of the Treasury to transfer gold between them.  To facilitate the transfers, the BEP printed one last series of Gold Certificates in 1934; which included the highest denomination ever produced in U.S. currency: $100,000.

The Gold Bar Exhibit is a collaborative project between the BEP and the United States Mint, in honor of the Making American History program, which commemorates the BEP’s 150 th Anniversary and the U. S. Mint’s 220th Anniversary.  Treasurer of the United States Rosie Rios has oversight of both Department of the Treasury bureaus – BEP and U.S. Mint.

The Bureau of Engraving and Printing is located at 14th & C Streets, SW, Washington, DC. Tickets to tour the facility are free and required through the end of August.  However, tickets are not required to go directly to the BEP’s Visitor Center, where the gold bars are displayed.

To obtain additional information about the BEP’s public tour operation, log onto
http://www.moneyfactory.gov or contact the Tour Office by telephone at 1 (866) 874-2330.

*Working Stock is the portion of Treasury-owned gold bullion reserve that the U.S. Mint can use as the raw material for minting coins.  Working stock gold comprises about one percent of the gold bullion reserve, and includes bars, blanks, unsold coins and condemned coins, according to the U.S. Mint.  As of July 31, 2012, U.S. Mint-held gold totaled 248,046,115.696 fine troy ounces.

Image/Copy: B.E.P.

Written by Robert L. Wilson

August 17, 2012 at 8:17 am

2012 Making American History Coin and Currency Set

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AMERICAN HISTORY MADE

2012 marks a significant milestone for two bureaus of the Department of Treasury. The United States Mint celebrates its 220th year and the Bureau of Engraving and Printing celebrates its 150th year of making coins and currency for our country. In honor of these major achievements, the United States Mint is proud to offer the 2012 Making American History Coin and Currency Set, which includes a 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof coin with an “S” mint mark and a series 2009 $5 note. Celebrate the making of American history and order today!

Image/Copy: U.S. Mint

Written by Robert L. Wilson

August 13, 2012 at 8:27 am

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